Web 2.0 : What Is It?

Posted on March 12, 2010. Filed under: Uncategorized |

The bursting of the dot-com bubble in the fall of 2001 marked a turning point for the web. Many people concluded that the web was overhyped, There is no clear definition of web 2.0.
The concept of “Web 2.0” began with a conference brainstorming session between O’Reilly and MediaLive International (Web 2.0 conference ) held in San Francisco Oct 2004 but one thing is clear Web 2.0 marks a fundamental change in how we use the Internet.
Web 1.0

Early Web development (retrospectively called as Web 1.0)

Simply we can say these :

·  Static pages instead of dynamic user-generated content.

·  The use of framesets.

·  Proprietary HTML extensions such as the <blink> and <marquee> tags introduced during the first browser war.

·  Online guestbooks.

·  GIF buttons, typically 88×31 pixels in size promoting web browsers and other products.

·  HTML forms sent via email. A user would fill in a form, and upon clicking submit their email client would attempt to send an email containing the form’s details
Web 2.0

Network connectivity is the most fundamental principle for Web 2.0 to succeed. Any collaboration amongst users is not possible without being connected to each other.

There are a plethora of web sites emphasizing the social aspects of Web 2.0 which was not prominent in Web 1.0.
AJAX, CSS, RSS/Atom, Folksonomies, Blogs, Mashups and REST are some of the main technologies that enable the principles of Web 2.0. In the subsequent blog entries,

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There is no clear-cut demarcation between Web 2.0 and Web 1.0 technologies, hardware and applications. The distinction is, to a large extent, subjective. Here are a few characteristics often noted as descriptive of Web 2.0:

  • blogging
  • Ajax and other new technologies
  • Google Base and other free Web services
  • RSS-generated syndication
  • social bookmarking
  • mash-ups
  • wikis and other collaborative applications
  • dynamic as opposed to static site content
  • interactive encyclopedias and dictionaries
  • ease of data creation, modification or deletion by individual users
  • advanced gaming.

“collection of technologies – be it VoIP, Digital Media, XML, RSS, Google Maps… whatever … that leverage the power of always on, high speed connections and treat broadband as a platform, and not just a pipe to connect.”

That is easy (few minutes learning curve), quick (intuitive) and effective (presentable). Flickr, Wikipedia, MySpace, Writely, Del.icio.us and YouTube are some of the most common (and successful) websites showing Web 2.0 concepts. Most of these websites have gained popularity in past 1.5 years but it’s hard to imagine life before them.

Web 2.0 era is the rise of blogging. Personal home pages have been around since the early days of the web, and the personal diary and daily opinion column around much longer than that,

& internet era software is that it is delivered as a service, not as a product.

Netscape was the standard bearer for Web 1.0, Google is most certainly the standard bearer for Web 2.0,

Web 1.0 Web 2.0
DoubleClick –> Google AdSense
Ofoto –> Flickr
Akamai –> BitTorrent
mp3.com –> Napster
Britannica Online –> Wikipedia
personal websites –> blogging
evite –> upcoming.org and EVDB
domain name speculation –> search engine optimization
page views –> cost per click
screen scraping –> web services
publishing –> participation
content management systems –> wikis
directories (taxonomy) –> tagging (“folksonomy”)
stickiness –> syndication

we believe to be the core competencies of Web 2.0 companies:

  • Services, not packaged software, with cost-effective scalability
  • Control over unique, hard-to-recreate data sources that get richer as more people use them
  • Trusting users as co-developers
  • Harnessing collective intelligence
  • Leveraging the long tail through customer self-service
  • Software above the level of a single device
  • Lightweight user interfaces, development models, AND business models

That is easy (few minutes learning curve), quick (intuitive) and effective (presentable). Flickr, Wikipedia, MySpace, Writely, Del.icio.us and YouTube are some of the most common (and successful) websites showing Web 2.0 concepts. Most of these websites have gained popularity in past 1.5 years but it’s hard to imagine life before them.
The idea of sharing information is being valued as much as the idea of proprietary information. Open source, which has been around for decades, is becoming a significant factor. And the web link is becoming a form of currency.

Web 2.0 vs Web 1.0   From Joe Drumgoole

  • Web 1.0 was about reading, Web 2.0 is about writing
  • Web 1.0 was about companies, Web 2.0 is about communities
  • Web 1.0 was about client-server, Web 2.0 is about peer to peer
  • Web 1.0 was about HTML, Web 2.0 is about XML
  • Web 1.0 was about home pages, Web 2.0 is about blogs
  • Web 1.0 was about portals, Web 2.0 is about RSS
  • Web 1.0 was about taxonomy, Web 2.0 is about tags
  • Web 1.0 was about wires, Web 2.0 is about wireless
  • Web 1.0 was about owning, Web 2.0 is about sharing
  • Web 1.0 was about IPOs, Web 2.0 is about trade sales
  • Web 1.0 was about Netscape, Web 2.0 is about Google
  • Web 1.0 was about web forms, Web 2.0 is about web applications
  • Web 1.0 was about screen scraping, Web 2.0 is about APIs
  • Web 1.0 was about dialup, Web 2.0 is about broadband
  • Web 1.0 was about hardware costs, Web 2.0 is about bandwidth costs
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